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Table 1 A priori dichotomization of subspecialties

From: Clinician awareness of brain computer interfaces: a Canadian national survey

SpecialtySubspecialties
“BCI-related”“Non-BCI-related”
Adult Neurology• Spinal cord injury
• Stroke
• Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
• Cerebral palsy
• Critical care/emergency neurology
• Neuromuscular disorders
• Alzheimer’s disease
• Acquired brain injury/traumatic brain injury
• Behavioural neurology
• Brain tumour
• Epilepsy
• Headache/migraine
• Movement disorders
• Multiple sclerosis
• Neuro-ophthalmology
• Neuro-oncology
• Pain/palliative
• Sleep disorders
Pediatric Neurology• Spinal cord injury
• Stroke and perinatal stroke
• Cerebral palsy
• Critical care/emergency neurology
• Neuromuscular disorders
• Acquired brain injury/traumatic brain injury
• Behavioural neurology
• Brain tumour
• Epilepsy
• Headache/migraine
• Movement disorders
• Multiple sclerosis
• Neuro-ophthalmology
• Neuro-oncology
• Pain/palliative
• Sleep disorders
Physiatry• Spasticity management
• Spinal cord injury
• Stroke
• Neuromuscular disorders
• Prosthetics and orthotics
• Acquired brain injury/traumatic brain injury
• Electrodiagnostic medicine
• Geriatric rehabilitation
• Musculoskeletal medicine
• Paediatric rehabilitation
• Pain management
• Pulmonary, cardiac and cancer rehabilitation
• Rheumatology
  1. Legend: A priori dichotomization was based on each specialty’s estimated likelihood of leading physicians to interact with patients who could benefit from BCI.