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Fig. 4 | Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation

Fig. 4

From: Augmenting propulsion demands during split-belt walking increases locomotor adaptation of asymmetric step lengths

Fig. 4

Leg orientation Adaptation and After-Effects. a Leg orientations are depicted for individual subjects (as indicated with different colors) in both the flat and incline conditions. Note that subjects orient their legs about their bodies differently and that leg orientations are based on slope. Thick vertical black lines indicated a significant effect of leg (i.e., paretic or non-paretic) and slope (i.e., flat or incline) on trailing leg positions. b Schematic of the slow and fast (predicted) baseline behavior for the paretic and non-paretic leg orientations, respectively. The speed-specific leg orientations were regained during Late Adaptation. c The similarity between leg orientations across the speed-specific Baseline and Late Adaptation epochs is illustrated by the significant regression (solid cyan line; |y| = a|x|, 95% confidence interval for a = [0.92, 1.13]). Recall that a slow Baseline was only collected in the flat session, thus only the slow Baseline and Late Adaptation for the paretic leg (which walked slow during Adaptation) are shown. Note that the regression line closely overlaps with the idealized situation in which baseline and late adaptation values are identical (dashed gray line; i.e., y = x) and the behavior of young, healthy adults ([70], dashed magenta line). d Schematic of the leg orientations during early Post-Adaptation. The forward leg positions are ipsilaterally and the trailing leg positions are contralaterally maintained from split-to-tied walking. e The ipsilateral and contralateral similarity between α and X, respectively, across the Late Adaptation and early Post-Adaptation epochs is quantified with a significant correlation (solid cyan line; |y| = a|x|, 95% confidence interval for a = [0.94, 1.02]). The idealized situation in which Late Adaptation and early Post-Adaptation values are identical (dashed gray line; i.e., y = x) and the behavior of young, healthy adults ([70], dashed magenta line) are presented as a reference

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